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  • SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans Available to Arizona Small Businesses (3/12)

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    March 15, 2021

    Disaster Field Operations Center West

     

    Release Date:  March 12, 2021

    Contact:  Richard A. Jenkins, (916) 735-1500, Richard.Jenkins@sba.gov

    Release Number:  AZ 16895-01

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    SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans Available to Arizona Small Businesses

     

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Small nonfarm businesses in all 15 Arizona counties and neighboring counties in California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah are now eligible to apply for low‑interest federal disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration, announced Director Tanya N. Garfield of SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West. These loans offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by drought in the following primary counties that began Jan. 1, 2021.

     

    Primary Arizona counties:  Apache, Cochise, Coconino, Gila, Graham, Greenlee, La Paz, Maricopa, Mohave, Navajo, Pima, Pinal, Santa Cruz, Yavapai and Yuma;

    Neighboring California counties:  Imperial, Riverside and San Bernardino;

    Neighboring Colorado county:  Montezuma;

    Neighboring Nevada counties:  Clark and Lincoln;

    Neighboring New Mexico counties:  Catron, Cibola, Grant, Hidalgo, McKinley and San Juan;

    Neighboring Utah counties:  Kane, San Juan and Washington.

     

    “SBA eligibility covers both the economic impacts on businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers that have suffered agricultural production losses caused by the disaster and businesses directly impacted by the disaster,” Garfield said.

     

    Small nonfarm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private nonprofit organizations of any size may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

     

    “Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage. These loans have an interest rate of 3 percent for businesses and 2 percent for private nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years and are available to small businesses and most private nonprofits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship,” Garfield said.

     

    By law, SBA makes Economic Injury Disaster Loans available when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture designates an agricultural disaster. The Secretary declared this disaster on March 5, 2021.

     

    Businesses primarily engaged in farming or ranching are not eligible for SBA disaster assistance. Agricultural enterprises should contact the Farm Services Agency about the U.S. Department of Agriculture assistance made available by the Secretary’s declaration. However, nurseries are eligible for SBA disaster assistance in drought disasters.

     

    Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX  76155.

     

    The deadline to apply for economic injury is Nov. 5, 2021.

     

     

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    About the U.S. Small Business Administration

    The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.